KALEIDOSCOPE - TOUR

 
 
  Support acts during 1980  
     
 

Altered Images
999
Athletico
Spizz 80

 
     

 

     
  DATE/VENUE  
     

 

     
  December  
 
 
  30/12/80 - London, Hammersmith Palais

Hammersmith Palais Ticket 30/12/80 - Click Here For Bigger Scan

Israel
Clockface
Into The Light (Live debut)
Tenant
Christine
Paradise Place
Red Over White
Red Light
Voodoo Dolly
Halloween (Live debut)
Happy House
Eve White/Eve Black
Skin
Conga Congo (Live debut)
Trophy
Jigsaw Feeling

 
     
  BOOTLEGS  
     
 

HALLOWEEN

Halloween LP Hammersmith Odeon 30/12/80 - Click Here For Bigger Scan 

 
     

 

     
  November  
 
 
  30/11/80 - Los Angeles, Whisky A Go Go 
Happy House
Clockface
Regal Zone
Trophy
Pulled To Bits
Tenant
Israel
Paradise Place 
Christine
Red Over White
Red Light
Voodoo Dolly
Drop Dead/Celebration
Jigsaw Feeling 

Encore: 

Hybrid
 
   
  29/11/80 - Los Angeles, Whisky A Go Go (Two Shows)

1st set 

Icon
Trophy
Clockface
Israel
Metal Postcard (Mittageisen)
Tenant
Christine
Red Over White
Red Light
Eve White/Eve Black
Switch
Jigsaw Feeling

 
   

 

     
  28/11/80 - Los Angeles, Whisky A Go Go (Two Shows)

Israel
Clockface
Hong Kong Garden
Skin
Pulled To Bits
Tenant
Paradise Place
Christine
Red Over White
Red Light
Happy House
Switch
Helter Skelter

 

 

   

 

     
  26/11/80 - San Francisco, California Hall 

California Hall Gig Flyer - Click Here For Bigger Scan

Israel
Clockface
Hong Kong Garden
Skin
Pulled To Bits
Metal Postcard
Tenant
Paradise Place
Christine
Red Over White
Trophy
Voodoo Dolly
Happy House
Switch
Eve White/Eve Black
Helter Skelter

 
     

 

     
  24/11/80 - Boston, 15 Landsdowne Street

Israel
Clockface
Hong Kong Garden
Skin
Pulled To Bits
Metal Postcard
Tenant
Paradise Place
Christine
Red Over White
Red Light
Voodoo Dolly
Happy House
Switch
Jigsaw Feeling
Eve White/Eve Black
Helter Skelter

 
     

 

     
  22/11/80 - Long Island, My Father's Place

Israel
Clockface
Hong Kong Garden
Regal Zone
Paradise Place
Pulled To Bits
Christine
Metal Postcard
Tenant
Red Over White
Red Light
Voodoo Dolly
Happy House
Switch
Eve White/Eve Black
Helter Skelter
Jigsaw Feeling

 
     

 

     
  21/11/80 - New York, Irving Plaza

Irving Plaza Poster - Click Here For Bigger Scan

Poppy Day
The Staircase (Mystery)
Clockface
Skin Pulled To Bits
Trophy
Tenant
Hybrid
Christine
Paradise Place
Israel
Red Light
Voodoo Dolly
Happy House
Switch
Hong Kong Garden
Jigsaw Feeling

 
     

 

     
  20/11/80 - New York, Irving Plaza  
     
  18/11/80 - Toronto, Concert Hall   
   

 

     
  16/11/80 - New York, The Palladium

Photograph By Joe Stevens

Helter Skelter
Playground Twist
Clockface
Skin
Pulled To Bits
Trophy
Tenant
Israel (Live debut)
Christine
Paradise Place
Red Light
Voodoo Dolly
Happy House
Switch
Eve White/Eve Black
Hong Kong Garden
Jigsaw Feeling
Red Over White (Live debut)

 
     
  NME 1980  
     
 

Siouxsie And The Banshees' opening - darkness and squealing feedback, lights revealing Siouxsie posing like Kabuki grotesquerie - is pretentious beyond excuse, and the 'Helter Skelter' it heralds more a butchering than an interpretation.  But 'Playground Twist', which follows, puts things back on track.  It's a spooky, sometimes uncomfortable ride, but well worth the price.

The Banshees' sound is abrasive and chilling, but centered on a beat as deep and natural as a heart pumping.  John McGeoch is a great guitarist.  His sound often reminds me of Keith Levine or Pat Place, yet his own individuality takes it beyond any comparison.

The set careens wildly between extremes of mood and sound, from soft, acoustic guitar fables like 'Christine' to raucous, screeching attacks of murky noise.  'Israel' is a standout, McGeoch getting a stunning, crystalline sound and Siouxsie's singing clear, almost pretty, yet assertive and disturbing.  'Red Light' is another, with Severin moving to synthesiser to create an ominous undercurrent, the song full of texture and exciting rhythm.

The visual contrast of the dark haired Siouxsie and her three dyed-blond men is contrived, but it is also stylish and effective, and much a relief after 999's stodgy orthodoxy.  The Banshees sometimes let the image, presence and atmosphere win out over ideas, feelings and content.  But they have the skill to succeed in creating just the right atmosphere - from horror-film menace to 'Happy House' exhilaration.  They are sometimes deliberately ugly, but that doesn't mean they deny beauty or its uses.

Siouxsie thumbs her nose at the audience a few times, in fun, but there's no suggestion of indifference in her attitude.  I would prefer less of her screeching and more of her singing (she has a good voice when she wants to use it), but there is logic to her choices.  She seems in touch with her audience and with herself.

They get two encores, not a proforma response and not merely fan adulation.  They played a long and varied set, and along the way lost some of the audience.  But their music has only a few handles to grab and in it, beauty and ugliness play an ironic push-pull game.  Those who stayed with it felt the rewards.

Richard Grabel

 
     

 

     
  14/11/80 - Philadelphia, Starlight Ballroom

Helter Skelter
Clockface
Playground Twist
Trophy
Paradise Place
Tenant
Pulled To Bits
Skin
Israel
Red Light
Voodoo Dolly
Happy House
Hong Kong Garden
Jigsaw Feeling
Nicotine Stain

 
   

 

     
  October  
 
 
  25/10/80 - Aylesbury, Friars

Intro
Helter Skelter
Clockface
Playground Twist
Trophy
Skin
Paradise Place
Pulled To Bits
Christine
Tenant
Red Light
Voodoo Dolly
Happy House
Switch
Regal Zone
Jigsaw Feeling

 
   

 

     
  22/10/80 - Birmingham, Top Rank

Intro
Helter Skelter
Clockface
Playground Twist
Trophy
Skin
Paradise Place
Pulled To Bits
Christine
Tenant
Red Light
Voodoo Dolly
Eve White/Eve Black
Happy House

 
   

 

     
  21/10/80 - Sheffield, Top Rank   
   

 

     
  20/10/80 - Bristol, Locarno Club

Bristol Locarno Club Ticket 20/10/80 - Click Here For Bigger Scan

Intro
Helter Skelter
Clockface
Playground Twist
Trophy
Skin
Paradise Place
Pulled To Bits
Christine
Tenant
Red Light
Voodoo Dolly
Happy House
Switch
Eve White/Eve Black
Regal Zone
Jigsaw Feeling
Nicotine Stain

 
     
  Sounds 1980  
     
 

Something seems to have got the Locarno management seriously paranoid tonight. Never before in all the time Iíve come here have I witnessed the ordinary punter getting such a hassle gaining admittance. Herded into sheepish groups on every landing, only allowed to approach the door in twos and having to submit to a body search before they even take the ticket - Is this really what going out for an eveningís entertainment is coming to?

What is it about Siouxsie And The Banshees that attracts such devotion I wonder, surveying the heaving, trad punk, crowd. Is it the same original survivors syndrome that guarantees the Clash their audience, never mind how glib and irrelevant theyíve become? That must be a large part of it I fear, for if they were all true blue music connoisseurs then theyíd have paid more attention to Altered Images, the support group. Not that I found them particularly invigorating myself, but they did warm up the rhythm to the right blood heat and pass as approachably modern, in spite of the female singer being a hasty tuck and sew job of everyone from Lene Lovich to Hazel OíConnor to Siouxsie herself.

Commencing in the by now familiar dirge like fashion Iíve learned to avoid, like the Gang Of Four or Joy Division, the Banshees push stark hypnotics to the point of drabness, perhaps even sleep if Iíd had the good fortune of leaning against something comfortable. Yet intermittently they can pull off some real gems.

The most engaging moment of the set for me was around the time an acoustic guitar began to poke through. I donít know the name of the song, but it had a deep poignant beauty about it, which was both uplifting and frustrating. It showed the depth of thought and feeling they are capable of, yet much of the set consists of two dimensional shuffles drifting nowhere. Predictably such things as "Happy House" gain the most crowd response, which only underlines for me the feeling that a lot of these people just arenít listening but merely attending another gig, one to be collected rather than savoured.

Towards the end my attention went completely and I ended up in aimless chatter with friends on the periphery of the event. This is the second time Iíve had Siouxsie And The Banshees ignite sparks in me, only to have them snuffed out almost immediately.

RAB

 
     

 

     
  19/10/80 - Swansea, Top Rank  
   
  17/10/80 - Dublin, Grand Cinema  
   

 

     
  16/10/80 - Belfast, Ulster Hall

Helter Skelter
Switch
Christine
Happy House....(Not complete or in correct order)

 
     
  NME 1980  
     
 

Such amoral maskplay, such an interminable racket... such a waste of time, money and energy.

Siouxsie And The Banshees (guitarist John McGeoch, bassist Steve Severin and drummer Budgie) descend the stairs at the back of the stage like four fragile rag-dolls with nothing to do or say, save what can be cloaked in the contrived collages they pass off as songs, distorted by their playing and obliterated by feedback.  Their performance reeks of supercilious detachment and artistic pretensions of the most unforgivable kind.

I last saw the Banshees in Belfast a year ago on what turned out to be their final gig before the departure of Kenny Morris and John McKay.  That night the non-arrival of their PA and the internal conflict were proferred as excuses for the shambolic set they delivered.  This time there's no such excuses, but the revamped line-up and the new  material from 'Kaleidoscope' show the Banshees have magnified their shortcomings and trapped themselves in a corner out of which they're going to find it very hard to escape.

Two soundmen - one at the side of the stage, the other at the back of the hall - give the impression they're here to sabotage the show as the mix is a disastrous murk.  The group open with a ludicrous version of 'Helter Skelter' - the excruciating sound of rats clawing inside the head.  McGeoch spends most of the number with his back to the audience cranking out a torturous scrawl of treble under which Siouxsie screams and rants; taking the song at breakneck speed, her voice is hard to hear, the lyrics indistinguishable.  As such it sets the mood, tone and pace for the remainder of the set.

The group possess an uncanny knack for making people stand still, and the reaction they create can be summed up in the lyrics of 'Switch':  "People walk and then they talk/People listen, then they halt."  That's all there is to do; despite ambitions and claims to have opened new and adventurous ways of communication, the Banshees are a receptacle for the most sterile and cliched ideas and posing imaginable.  Their songs convey absolutely nothing; though they display a tiresome predilection for "freaky" themes, they never take sides or try to make a moral statement.  That's the least one expects from a group so obsessed with subjects like insanity, personality confusion and paranoia.  But then when you can't hear the words there wouldn't be much point anyway.

Their sound can be little more than a globule or two away from the very worst Heavy Metal.  How a guitarist like McGeoch, who showed himself capable of some fresh and worthwhile playing on 'The Correct Use Of Soap' got roped into all this nonsense I'll never know,  It's an endless assault on the eardrums, most songs are rendered indistinguishable and qualities like colour, mood and texture are non-existent.

For all Sioux's chic Red Indian gear and her cohorts cultivation of the concerned-young-men-0in-the-'80s with hair falling neatly in their eyes, they could as easily be Rainbow or The Ramones onstage.  The only time they relent is for the comparatively sprightly 'Christine' and the jolly 'Happy House'.  People actually dance and shout for 'Hong Kong Garden' (which just shows how unpopular the group's album material is).  Naturally, they don't play their first hit single and become the first group I've ever seen in Belfast not to get an encore.

One of the reasons Siouxsie And The Banshees got involved in music in the first place was to extend the bounds of mass consumption.  That may sound a laudable aim, but what it amounts to now is that they've given themselves a licence to churn out lazy, self-indulgent tripe, and with the financial backing of a major record company they can insult audiences all over the country.  What jolly clever people!

All the well worn lines of criticism regarding the group's lack of emotion, the one-dimensional nature of their music and the gaudy glorification of their songs, still hold firm.  These days they're even more apt as the group rely on their abysmal past and head into a purposeless future.

The black witch and her three helpers dream up a world where Charles Manson rubs shoulders with a girl suffering from 26 extra personalities and ladies are mutilated in plastic surgery operations that go wrong.  They provide the perfect soundtrack to stop you from caring.

Gavin Martin

 
   

 

     
  14/10/80 - Manchester, Apollo Theatre  
   

 

     
  12/10/80 - Amsterdam, Paradiso

Intro
Helter Skelter
Playground Twist
Trophy
Skin
Paradise Place
Pulled To Bits
Christine
Tenant
Red Light
Voodoo Dolly
Happy House
Switch
Eve White/Eve Black
Regal Zone
Jigsaw Feeling
Clockface
Nicotine Stain

 
   

 

     
  09/10/80 - Koln, Stadthalle Muhlheim

Intro
Helter Skelter
Playground Twist
Trophy
Skin
Paradise Place
Pulled To Bits
Christine
Tenant
Red Light
Voodoo Dolly
Happy House
Switch
Regal Zone
Jigsaw Feeling
Clockface
Nicotine Stain

 
   

 

     
  08/10/80 - Weissenohe, To Act Club

Skin
Happy House 
Hybrid... (Not complete or in correct order)

 
   

 

     
  07/10/80 - Wiesbaden, Wartburg  
   
  06/10/80 - Hannover, Rotation  
   

 

     
  05/10/80 - Hamburg, Markthalle

Helter Skelter
Playground Twist
Trophy
Skin
Paradise Place
Pulled To Bits
Christine
Tenant
Red Light
Voodoo Dolly
Happy House
Switch
Regal Zone
Jigsaw Feeling

 
   

 

     
  03/10/80 - Berlin, Tempodrum

Berlin, Tempodrum

 
     

 

     
  01/10/80 - Paris, Bataclan

Bataclan Poster - Click Here For Bigger Scan

With Permission, Courtesy Of www.newwavephotos.com - Click Here For Bigger Scan

Helter Skelter
Playground Twist
Trophy
Skin
Paradise Place
Pulled To Bits
Christine
Tenant
Red Light
Voodoo Dolly
Happy House
Eve White/Eve Black
Regal Zone
Jigsaw Feeling

 
     

 

     
  September  
 
 
  28/09/80 - Brussels, Ancienne Belgique

Ticket Ancienne Belgique, Brussels 28/09/80 - Courtesy Of Philippe - Click Here For Bigger Scan

 
     

 

     
  27/09/80 - Deinze, Brielpoort  
     

 

     
  26/09/80 - Belgium, Lux Herenthout

With Permission, Courtesy Of www.newwavephotos.com - Click Here For Bigger Scan

 
     

 

     
  13/09/80 - Leeds, Queen's Hall (Futurama Festival)

Leeds, Queen's Hall (Futurama Fest) Click Here For Bigger Scan

Icon
Playground Twist
Christine
Pulled To Bits
Paradise Place*
Tenant
Switch
Desert Kisses
Skin
Red Light
Eve White/Eve Black*
Happy House
Regal Zone
Jigsaw Feeling
Voodoo Dolly (Live debut)
Helter Skelter

*Televised 13/09/80

 
     
  Melody Maker 02/09/80  
     
 

Meanwhile, most of the audience are more interested in positioning themselves in front of the left-hand stage, where billtopper Siouxsie and the Banshees are due to come on.

Theyíre not disappointed. Siouxsieís performance is quite simply one of the most inspiring Iíve ever seen anyone give. She owns the stage, turning the traditional passive sex symbol role of the female singer on its head. She chastises the hordes of 18- to 21-year-old wide-eyed youths reaching their hands out towards her, telling them, "I didnít say you could talk" like a schoolmistress. Siouxsie is sexual, but in a dominant way, smashing a tambourine against a mike stand and flailing her microphone lead like a whip. The Banshees seem to feed off the atmosphere of near hysteria as they run through powerful versions of most of the songs from "Kaleidoscope", and McGeoch and Budgie add new touches to older songs like "Switch", "Regal Zone" and "Jigsaw Feeling". Itís an overwhelming performance, and I almost panic at the threat of being crushed by people hanging precariously off the scaffolding around the stage....

Lynden Barber

 
     

 

     
  11/09/80 - Retford, Porterhouse (Janet & the Icebergs)  

Icon
Playground Twist
Christine
Pulled To Bits
Tenant
Happy House
Switch
Eve White/Eve Black
Red Light
Paradise Place
Skin
Jigsaw Feeling

 
   

 

     
  10/09/80 - Nottingham, Boatclub (Janet & the Icebergs)

Icon
The Staircase (Mystery)
Pulled To Bits

Regal Zone
Happy House
Tenant
Switch
Eve White/Eve Black
Red Light
Paradise Place
Skin
Jigsaw Feeling

 
     

 

     
  09/09/80 - Liverpool, Brady's Club (Janet & the Icebergs) 

Brady's Club Ticket - Click Here For Bigger Scan

Icon
The Staircase (Mystery)
Pulled To Bits
Voodoo Dolly (Unofficial live debut)
Happy House
Drop Dead/Celebration
Regal Zone
Switch
Playground Twist
Tenant
Paradise Place (Live debut)
Skin (Live debut)

 
     

 

     
  March  
 
 
  29/03/80 - London, Music Machine

Playground Twist
Pulled To Bits
Christine
Regal Zone
The Staircase (Mystery)
Desert Kisses
Switch
Happy House
Hybrid
Jigsaw Feeling
Hong Kong Garden
Mirage
Helter Skelter
Nicotine Stain
Drop Dead/Celebration

 
     

 

     
  27/03/80 - London, Music Machine

With Permission, Courtesy Of www.newwavephotos.com - Click Here For Bigger Scan

Playground Twist
Pulled To Bits
Christine
Regal Zone
The Staircase (Mystery)
Desert Kisses
Switch
Happy House
Hybrid
Jigsaw Feeling
Hong Kong Garden
Mirage
Helter Skelter
Drop Dead/Celebration

 
     
  Record Mirror 05/04/80  
     
 

Maybe there is such a thing as a phoenix after all - and for a band that's had more than its share of bonfires, this particular rising was a blitzkrieg.

From the word go, it was no holds barred as they launched into 'Playground Twist', fair near cracking the walls in the process.  It was clear from the start that this was a much happier ensemble than was witnessed last time around.  A maroon - suited Siouxsie sprang up and down looking as if she was actually enjoying herself.  Gone is the distant, total iciness which in the past resulted in audience alienation.  Indeed she was actually affable to the hoard of white hands crawling up the sides of the monitors, smiling and crouching down as near to the edge as she dared whilst the Banshees throbbed like a well - tuned engine.

They positively worked their asses off - Severin looked thoughtful.  The balconies were overflowing with heaving bodies as they went into 'Staircase'.  John McGeoch's guitar work is not quite so jangling as his predecessors, complimenting rather than dominating.  Halfway into the set and the dance floor resembled a volcanic eruption.  'Switch' was followed by 'Happy House' - this is what the packed Music Machine had been waiting for.  Then a new number which sounded almost like Led Zeppelin's 'Kashmir'!  "You wont hear that again," she quipped.  By now the whole band were leaping around like things possessed - and was this girl in fine voice! - The whole place was reverberating to the strains of 'Hong Kong Garden'.

The end came with a shattering 'Helter Skelter'.  Siouxsie coiled up behind the monitors, rose up like Medusa, arms whirling, the band bleaching the front row white.  They returned, after exciting so suddenly that it took the audience a while to register it was over, to deliver 'Drop Dead/Celebration' with enough vitriol to burn the lining off an asbestos suit.  'Complacency' was a near miss and it's a relief to see them at last starting to fulfill their early promise.  Run for cover 'cos the Banshees are coming to get you!

Gill Smith

 
     

 

     
  25/03/80 - Glasgow, Tiffany's Club

With Permission, Courtesy Of www.newwavephotos.com - Click Here For Bigger Scan

Playground Twist
Pulled To Bits
Christine
Regal Zone
The Staircase (Mystery)
Desert Kisses
Switch
Happy House
Hybrid
Jigsaw Feeling
Hong Kong Garden
Suburban Relapse
Helter Skelter
Drop Dead/Celebration

 
     

 

     
  24/03/80 - Edinburgh, Tiffany's Club

Edinburgh, Tiffany's Club Click Here For Bigger Scan

 
     

 

     
  23/03/80 - Aberdeen, Fusion Club

With Permission, Courtesy Of www.newwavephotos.com - Click Here For Bigger Scan

 
     

 

     
  21/03/80 - Stirling, Stirling University

Stirling 21/03/80 - Click Here For Bigger Scan

 
     
  NME 05/04/80  
     
 

Blizzards across the northern wastelands; last minute transport traumas; Stirling University's early schedules; missing dispatches...

Anyway, we arrived late.  Missed Scars, a favourite group, and walked into a Banshee-regulated environment ten minutes old.  But nobody was dancing.  A few people were swaying slightly, others nodded in time.  Down the sides of the hall people were lying on the floor amongst piles of discarded beercans.

All in all a normal University crowd of the mildly curious, the mildly indifferent, the exhibitionist drunks, the unconscious and the people who like to go along to see groups, drink beer, jump around, have a great time and spend the entire evening shouting for one song they heard a few times and quite liked.  Maybe a few fans were there too, but it would be interesting to know how many in the crowd would have bothered going to see the Banshees in an outside hall if they didn't just happen to be the entertainment at the place they were going anyway.

"For all those who want 'Helter Skelter'.... (muffled cheering)"... here's a Banshee ballad."

'Desert Kisses' is the third new song out of six.  Members of the audience decide to transfer their weight to the other foot.  'Desert Kisses' is sad and slow.  Sioux's vocals lost and innocent, instead of the usual proud and strident soaring through impenetrable, guitar vastness like a robot pterodactyl fitted with neutron blasters.

Siouxsie & The Banshees deserve our esteem for their invaluable work in jarring modern music from its rut to two chord oblivion.  Considering their humble origins, what the Banshees have achieved has been remarkable.

That aside - and whatever transcendentally uplifting experiences they may have conjured at past gigs - onstage Siouxsie & The Banshees are almost completely dismal and one-dimensional.  They cant compete with the range of strange emotions and new atmospheres effortlessly created by such as Pere Ubu and Simple Minds (and stay tuned for Edinburgh's Josef K), or even the less supple but infinitely subtle wonderments of Scars and Joy Division.

Whatever macabre humour or cunning ingenuities the band see in their own work is lost in the relentless instrumentation, and in particular Sioux's imperious vocals.

Basically the Banshees remain guilty of humourlessness, detachment and similar accusations, more so than any of their contemporaries - live at least, where it matters most.

After 'Desert Kisses' a few fans cheer when they recognise the opening notes of 'Switch'.  Half a dozen start to pogo.  Steven Severin looks, briefly, as if he's about to glance at the audience, but doesn't.  John McGeoch, on short-term lease from Magazine, bends in concentration over his guitar, leans back a little and disappears behind his fringe.  Budgie puts the hammer down as momentum builds.

And suddenly, as if the floor hurled them there, the audience, as one are in the air and pogoing like a person who pogos a lot.  For 'Happy House' they reach new levels of wild excess.  A skinhead pours lager over his head.  That's how happy they are.

'Hybrid', another new song, soon puts a stop to that.  Another Wagnerian opus; more teutonic veneer.  The new songs seem a bit longer, more complex (there are slow bits and fast bits).

This isn't really the most favourable time to review the Banshees.  This is a low-key tour, really just a few of the places cancelled from last time which weren't rescheduled.  And this was the first gig (they want to forget about Liverpool the previous night) at a particularly unstable stage of their career before an indifferent audience.

There was no encore because "They didn't dance to 'Celebration'." (Dance to a marching beat?)

Lets not be too dismissive just now and hope that the Banshees take the opportunity for some reassessment.

Glenn Gibson

 
     

 

     
  19/03/80 - Manchester, Osbourne Club

Pulled To Bits (Live debut)
Happy House (Live debut)
Hybrid (Live debut)
Christine (Live debut)
Desert Kisses (Live debut)
Drop Dead/Celebration (Live debut)

 
     
  Melody Maker 29/03/80  
     
 

The gig that should have been at Ericís.

The Osborne Club is not the best of places to play a warm up gig for a tour. When Ericís Roger Eagle is not hiring the club, itís a roller disco - and it shows. "Guys" and "Dolls" written over the toilets. Notices telling us: "Speed skaters will be sat down for 10 minutes" and "No chewing gum".

The deejay announces that the PA is connected to the beer pump, so when the group are on, we wonít be able to buy any draught beer.

They enter the stage to the sound of childrenís screams, distant yet claustrophobic, a venomous noise, and into the sinister lilt of "Playground Twist".

Itís all very dramatic. As the speed changes, Siouxsie becomes a pendulum swaying from side to side, one white spotlight on her face, shrieking in that typical Siouxsie way which seems hackneyed now. I donít know about Gothic. These days itís like a horror film without the suspense. The initial shock is still there, but no fear. Itís as if the horror images on your TV screen come alive but you know they wonít step out of it and touch your life. All you can fear is your own emotions, your own response. So is it possible to enjoy the Banshees?

On a purely musical level (if there is such a thing), yes. If you donít bring out your emotions (and the gestures are still too large for warmth), you notice that the sound is good. The present line up works well. Although Siouxsieís vocals still dominate, itís closer now to a wall of sound than just rhythm plus screams.

And some of the new material shows possible changes. Siouxsieís discovered a gentler tone in her voice, which comes as a relief, like the new cooing voice in "Happy House" which is mellower and less abrasive than of old. All promising signs, and thereís a chance that the people that missed the group due to the shattering events of the last tour will get a better deal this time.

Penny Kiley